The 2013 show has just concluded and I will post the artist photos shortly.  For now I have their biographies and links posted below. Each year I will put more into this website, so please visit frequently.  

2013 Curators / Artists:
Graham Johnson
Graham is a Certified Medical Illustrator who has specialized in visualizing molecular and cellular biology since graduating from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1997. He illustrated both editions of the textbook Cell Biology by Pollard & Earnshaw as a coauthor, and has created thousands of scientific visuals ranging from journal covers to pedagogic animations and game designs. Since graduating from The Scripps Research Institute in 2011, Graham has worked at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) as a qb3@UCSF Faculty Fellow. His “Mesoscope” lab primarily develops algorithms to enable researchers and illustrators to generate, simulate, and visualize molecular models of cells. Additional projects interoperate the computational tools of science and art. Efforts to engage outreach audiences include curating biological animation festivals and gallery shows like ASCB2, and hosting visualization challenges designed to team biologists with artists to produce epic narrative imagery while enhancing tool development.
You can learn more about these tools and careers in scientific visualization at:
mesoscope.org
grahamj.com

2013 Contributing Artists:
Edmond Alexander CMI
Edmond is a certified medical illustrator and a Fellow of the Association of Medical Illustrators. He received a Bachelor of Science in Pre Biological Oceanography and Art at the University of Southern Mississippi 1967. Edmond is a self-trained medical illustrator who began his career in medical illustration at the University of Texas Medical School in Galveston and later at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. In Dallas, as an Associate Professor of Biomedical Communications, Edmond taught animation and film graphics in the School's Graduate Program of Biomedical Communications (Medical Illustration).
In 1984 he formed the Alexander and Turner Medical Illustration Studio with his Partner, Cynthia Turner. Today Edmond specializes in the 2D and 3D visualizations of cellular and molecular subjects, pathophysiology, and drug modes-of-actions for pharmaceutical companies, their agencies, and medical publishers. His illustration was heavily influenced by the beauty of the Disney films during his childhood years, and the art of Frank Armitage during his formative years in medical illustration. Known for his rich sense of color Edmond provides memorable and unique visual solutions to complex subjects.
edmondalexander.com
vimeo.com/67983920
vimeo.com/60559771

Frank Armitage
A native Australian, Frank Armitage in his early career, became involved with the Mexican mural painting movement and, in 1949, after winning an international mural contest sponsored by David Alfaro Siquieros, world renowned Mexican muralist, he became his assistant on several murals in Public Buildings in Mexico. He moved to Los Angeles in 1952 and worked at the Walt Disney Studios on animation backgrounds and layout for such feature films as Peter Pan, Sleeping Beauty, Man In Space, Mary Poppins, and The Jungle Book. Frank joined Disney Imagineering in 1977. His artwork of anatomical subject matter was a prime factor in paving the way for the Wonders of Life Pavilion at EPCOT Center in Florida. Some of the most prominent work by Frank Armitage includes illustrating the function of the brain, a project for LIFE Magazine (see image #23). In 1971, partnering with the extraordinary photographic work of Lennart Nilsson. Frank also did the production illustration for Academy Award winning film, Fantastic Voyage for 20th Century Fox. This body of work now resides in the permanent collection of the Department of Biomedical Information Services, University of Illinois, Chicago. Since retiring from Disney in 1989, Frank completed a course in Oriental Medicine and pursued postgraduate work in Acupuncture in China. He volunteers in rural Mexico with the Flying Doctors. At present time the artist has produced oil paintings and murals for private homes in Woodside, Saratoga, Los Angeles and Paso Robles, California. Mr. Armitage is available for commissioned work. 
Armitage Lecture Series: uic.edu/depts/bvis/armitage/
Contact: armitageimages.com
Drew Berry MS, MacArthur Fellow
Drew Berry is a biologist-animator whose scientifically accurate and aesthetically rich visualizations reveal cellular and molecular processes for a wide range of audiences. Trained as a cell biologist and microscopist Drew brings a rigorous scientific approach to each project, immersing himself in relevant research to ensure current data are represented. Drew received B.Sc. (1993) and M.Sc. (1995) degrees from the University of Melbourne. Since 1995, he has been a biomedical animator at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. His animations have exhibited at venues such as the Guggenheim Museum, MoMA, the Royal Institute of Great Britain and the University of Geneva. In 2010 he received a MacArthur Fellowship "Genius Award".
wehi.edu.au/education/wehitv/about_wehi-tv

Thomas Brown MA, CMI
Thomas Brown is Founder and Creative Director at Vessel Studios. He graduated from The Medical College of Georgia’s Medical Illustration program in 2005. He worked as Animation Director at Nucleus Medical Media for eight years where he grew the department to the largest team of medically trained animators in the country and directed and produced hundreds of medical animations. Thomas founded Vessel Studios in 2013 on the premise that science is cinematic by nature, and medical animation has the ability to teach complex scientific concepts to any audience. He actively teaches his animation methods and is a regular speaker at The Medical College of Georgia and Johns Hopkins University. Thomas has produced internationally honored animations and his work is regularly accepted in the SIGGRAPH Computer Animation Festival.
vesselstudios.com

Adam Gardner As the printing tech and 3D designer, Adam operates a non-profit 3D molecular model printing service in Art Olson’s Molecular Graphics Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute. He derives his expertise in physical modeling from the decades of experience in virtual molecular modeling and visualization passed down by the lab. The printed physical models are used around the world as teaching tools, as objects to generate or test theories, as analogue computers (e.g., for measuring distances and angles in flexible systems and to complement augmented reality software developed in the lab), and as aesthetically pleasing objects on the boundary of art and science.
models.scripps.edu

David S. Goodsell PhD
David Goodsell is an Associate Professor of Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. from UCLA, where he used x-ray crystallography and computer graphics to study the structure of DNA. He now divides his time between biomolecular research and science education. He is author of the Molecule of the Month, a feature at the RCSB Protein Data Bank (pdb.org) that presents the structure and function of a new molecule each month, and several illustrated books on biological molecules and their diverse roles within living cells, and the growing connections between biology and nanotechnology.
mgl.scripps.edu/people/goodsell

Janet Iwasa PhD
Janet is an assistant professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Her lab creates molecular and cellular animations and animation tools that enable learning, research and scientific communication. Janet’s illustrations and animations are displayed in science museums, and have graced the pages and covers of numerous scientific journals including Nature, Science and Cell. Her animation work has won awards from the NSF/AAAS International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge and the annual CellDance competition by the ASCB. As an NSF Discovery Corps postdoctoral fellow, Dr. Iwasa created a multimedia exhibit on the origins of life in collaboration with Jack Szostak (MGH) and the Museum of Science (Boston). She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of California, San Francisco for her work on the actin cytoskeleton in the laboratory of Dyche Mullins, and completed 3D animation training at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects later that same summer.
biochem.web.utah.edu/iwasaonemicron.com

Gabriel Lander PhD
Gabe is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. His group uses cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of large protein complexes to better understand their role in the cellular environment. In addition to performing research, Gabe works hard to promote scientific awareness within the general public. “The non-scientific community plays a significant role in determining scientific policy and funding, and for this reason it is crucial that researchers perform some type of outreach.” To this end, he has given lectures about his research in science museums and high school programs, in addition to utilizing graphics programs to render images and movies to aid in explaining complex scientific concepts to non-experts.
scripps.edu/lander

Elaine Meng PhD
Elaine is a Specialist in the UCSF Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) interested in protein structure/function, computational chemistry, biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, and technical writing. She works in both the Babbitt Lab and the Computer Graphics Lab (CGL). The CGL develops the molecular graphics and analysis program UCSF Chimera. Elaine tests the software, participates in development and design, writes the Chimera User's Guide, and interacts with users.
cgl.ucsf.edu/home/meng

Fabian de Kok Mercado MA, CMI
Fabian is a Certified Medical Illustrator who received his Master's in Medical and Biological Illustration from the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Visualization of molecular data has been key a component of Fabian’s workflow since his time at the Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center and the NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility. He is currently the Scientific Illustrator and Animator for Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education and co-founded ProAtlantal Studio with his wife and colleague, Lydia Gregg.
proatlantal.com

Kirk Moldoff MS
Kirk is a biomedical illustrator and animator who has been creating scientifically accurate yet dramatic imagery for the pharma, publishing and research communities for the past 30 years. He received a BA in Neuroscience and an MS in Medical Education from the University of Rochester and has been acknowledged by his peers for innovation in the field of biomedical illustration from the creation of the original “Glassman” for the National Geographic Society as a novel means of depicting human anatomy to his “macroscapes” illustrating cellular and molecular panoramas, now standard techniques in the field of anatomical and molecular art. He continues to operate Kirk Moldoff Studios in Princeton, New Jersey, creating animations, illustrations, and working with interactive designers of virtual environments for museums. He is always up for new challenges.
galeriekirk.com

Megan Riel-Mehan PhD
Megan completed her PhD in Chemistry and Chemical Biology in Kevan Shokat's lab at the University of California, San Francisco. Before coming to UCSF she earned a BS in Chemical Biology and a BA in Studio Art at UC Berkeley. She is interested in visualization of biological systems, especially cell signaling pathways and is currently working to develop sigViz, a tool researchers will be able to use to visualize and animate their models of signaling networks.
sigviz.org

Andrew Swift MA, CMI
Andrew is creative director and founding partner of iSO-FORM a leader in interactive medical content. With a background in fine art and education, Andrew combines 3d sculpture (ZBrush) with diagnostic imaging (OsiriX) to produce his illustrations and digital models. Whether sketching on paper or modeling in the computer, Andrew strives to better understand and depict anatomy as it exists in the living body.
iso-form.com

Cynthia Turner MA, CMI
Cynthia is a certified medical illustrator and a Fellow of the Association of Medical Illustrators. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Colorado State University, 1979, and a Master of Arts in Biomedical Illustration from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, 1982. She is an adjunct assistant professor of Biomedical Visualization at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Cynthia is a partner with Edmond Alexander in the Alexander & Turner Medical Illustration Studio. She creates original illustrations describing pathophysiological cascades, drug actions and devices for pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology firms and their agencies. Her work appears in the annual juried RxClub Show - Best in Medical Advertising in New York and the annual salons of the Association of Medical Illustrators. Her art was selected for inclusion in the juried Art of Medicine Exhibition, New York and the juried Dream Anatomy Exhibition at the National Library of Medicine. Johnson & Johnson honored her with a one-man show of The Medical Art of Cynthia Turner. She has served as the Artist-in-Residence for Varian Surgical Sciences for the last 4 years, creating over 15 large scale works for advertising and limited edition prints. Cynthia is constantly inspired by the beauty of the human body, the fascination of pathophysiology and the ingenuity of medical advances. She is represented by Gail Thurm of Shannon Associates in New York.
cynthiaturner.com

Four winners of the autoPACK Visualization Challenge 2013: present HIV in Blood Serum using cellPACK
In an official Computer Graphics Society art contest, Graham Johnson teamed with the Olson lab, Autodesk and CG Society to challenge the participants “to convey humanity's complex relationships with HIV, be they emotional, political, or intellectual.” He further asked them “to excite general audiences with visuals that will help our labs spread interest in the search for a cure.” 

Please visit the site to see the amazing video and still image submissions: 

At ASCB2 2013 we present the top awarded artists from the still image category:

Alexey Kashpersky
1st place from Poltava, Ukraine Biology inspires Art. Alexey Kashpersky writes, “I have expressed in this work the pain, suffering and fear of the unknown, which with inconceivable paradox, goes hand in hand with physical beauty, light, and feelings of love and passion.” Alexey has recently started working at Thomas Direct Studios in New Jersey. kashpersky.com

Jiri Klusak
2nd place from Svitavy, Czech Republic In a very tight race for 1st place, Biomolecular chemist Jiri Klusak tamed and expanded the autoPACK models with his own optimizations and packings to submit an epic physiological poster describing a portion of the HIV life cycle. Jiri writes, “The goal was to depict my inner vision of a dynamic and crowded molecular landscape and autoPACK convinced me [that it is] an awesome tool for this purpose.”
jiri.klusak@gmail.com

Deshu Diosh
3rd place from Poland Deshu Diosh’s editorial visual metaphorically envisions an injectable cure-all that “cleans” blood plasma of infectious agents.
deshu.pl

Andrew McWhae
4th place from Canada Andrew presented a stunning rendering to highlight the anatomy of the cellPACK HIV recipe and modeled interacting phospholipids to replace the simplified bilayer shell provided by the original model.
andrewmcwhae.daportfolio.com





In 2012, the first annual Art and Science of Cell Biology exhibit featured 65 pieces from 9 contributing artists. The hung pieces represented techniques spanning 5 decades. Please visit the Gallery page to "walk" through the virtual gallery.

2012 Curators / Artists:
Graham Johnson
Graham Johnson has specialized in molecular and cellular biology since graduating from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Art as Applied to Medicine program in 1997. He illustrated both editions of the textbook Cell Biology by Pollard & Earnshaw as a coauthor, and has created thousands of scientific visuals ranging from journal covers to pedagogic animations. Graham’s recent PhD work in the Molecular Graphics Lab at The Scripps Research Institute focused primarily on developing algorithms to enable scientists and illustrators to generate, simulate, and visualize molecular models of cells. Now at The University of California, San Francisco as a qb3@UCSF Faculty Fellow, he continues to work with programmers to develop software that can interoperate the computational tools of science and art. You can learn more about these tools at http://www.mesoscope.org and at the ASCB working group described below.
Police sketch by Nick Woolridge, Toronto 2012.
www.grahamj.com
Janet Iwasa
Janet Iwasa is currently a lecturer in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School specializing in molecular and cellular animation. Her broad goal is to create molecular and cellular animations that will enable learning, research and scientific communication. Iwasa's illustrations and animations are currently on display at the Museum of Science, and have graced the pages and covers of numerous scientific journals including Nature, Science and Cell. In addition, her animation work has been recognized with awards from the NSF/AAAS International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge and the annual CellDance competition by the ASCB. As a NSF Discovery Corps postdoctoral fellow, Dr. Iwasa created a multimedia exhibit on the origins of life in collaboration with Jack Szostak (MGH) and the Museum of Science (Boston). She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of California, San Francisco for her work on the actin cytoskeleton in the laboratory of Dyche Mullins, and completed 3D animation training at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects later that same summer.
http://iwasa.hms.harvard.edu
http://onemicron.com

2012 Contributing Artists:
Frank Armitage
A native Australian, Frank Armitage in his early career, became involved with the Mexican mural painting movement and, in 1949, after winning an international mural contest sponsored by David Alfaro Siquieros, world renowned Mexican muralist, he became his assistant on several murals in Public Buildings in Mexico. He moved to Los Angeles in 1952 and worked at the Walt Disney Studios on animation backgrounds and layout for such feature films as Peter Pan, Sleeping Beauty, Man In Space, Mary Poppins, and The Jungle Book. Frank joined Disney Imagineering in 1977. His artwork of anatomical subject matter was a prime factor in paving the way for the Wonders of Life Pavilion at EPCOT Center in Florida. Some of the most prominent work by Frank Armitage includes illustrating the function of the brain, a project for LIFE Magazine (see image #23). In 1971, partnering with the extraordinary photographic work of Lennart Nilsson. Frank also did the production illustration for Academy Award winning film, Fantastic Voyage for 20th Century Fox. This body of work now resides in the permanent collection of the Department of Biomedical Information Services, University of Illinois, Chicago. Since retiring from Disney in 1989, Frank completed a course in Oriental Medicine and pursued postgraduate work in Acupuncture in China. He volunteers in rural Mexico with the Flying Doctors. At present time the artist has produced oil paintings and murals for private homes in Woodside, Saratoga, Los Angeles and Paso Robles, California. Mr. Armitage is available for commissioned work.
Armitage Lecture Series: http://www.uic.edu/depts/bvis/armitage/
Contact: http://www.armitageimages.com
Ludovic Autin
Ludovic Autin is a post-doctoral researcher in Art Olson’s Molecular Graphics Laboratory at the Scripps Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. from Paris 5 University, where he used protein-protein docking approaches to study the blood coagulation cascade. His research now focuses on the development of tangible molecular models that are augmented with computer-generated imagery and data (e.g. Augmented Reality) and the development of software that helps to close the gap between science and art. You can learn more about his projects here :
http://epmv.scripps.edu
http://upy.scripps.edu
http://mgl.scripps.edu/projects/tangible_models/mobile-ar
Drew Berry
Drew Berry is a biologist-animator whose scientifically accurate and aesthetically rich visualizations reveal cellular and molecular processes for a wide range of audiences. Trained as a cell biologist and microscopist Drew brings a rigorous scientific approach to each project, immersing himself in relevant research to ensure current data are represented. Drew received B.Sc. (1993) and M.Sc. (1995) degrees from the University of Melbourne. Since 1995, he has been a biomedical animator at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. His animations have exhibited at venues such as the Guggenheim Museum, MoMA, the Royal Institute of Great Britain and the University of Geneva. In 2010 he received a MacArthur Fellowship "Genius Award".
http://www.wehi.edu.au/education/wehitv/about_wehi-tv
Digizyme
Founded by Gaël McGill, Digizyme is a leading web and multimedia design firm for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, academic and medical research communities. Since its inception in 1999, Digizyme has served over 100 life science clients in the Greater Boston area as well the US, Canada, and abroad. These include individual scientists & physicians, research laboratories, departments, institutions, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. The common thread in all digizyme projects is a passion for the visual communication of science and a dedication to finding creative design solutions for their clients. The digizyme team accomplishes this through a combination of distinctive graphic design, in-depth knowledge of the content, and innovative multimedia technologies. Their unique approach lies in the combination of the team’s varied backgrounds as academic scientists, teachers, graphic designers, multimedia programmers and 3D artists. http://www.digizyme.com
Adam Gardiner
As the printing tech and 3D designer, Adam Gardiner operates a non-profit 3D molecular model printing service in Art Olson’s Molecular Graphics Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute. He derives his expertise in physical modeling from the decades of experience in virtual molecular modeling and visualization passed down by the lab. The printed physical models are used around the world:
as pedagogic tools for students or those unfamiliar with atomistic structures
as objects to generate or test theories e.g., the structure of DNA
to provide immediate tactile and visual messaging
to provide easy interactivity for many processes
as analogue computers (e.g., for measuring distances and angles in flexible systems and to complement augmented reality software developed in the lab)
as aesthetically pleasing objects on the boundary of art & science
http://models.scripps.edu
David S. Goodsell
David Goodsell is an Associate Professor of Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. from UCLA, where he used x-ray crystallography and computer graphics to study the structure of DNA. He now divides his time between biomolecular research and science education. He is author of the Molecule of the Month, a feature at the RCSB Protein Data Bank that presents the structure and function of a new molecule each month, and several illustrated books on biological molecules and their diverse roles within living cells, and the growing connections between biology and nanotechnology.
http://mgl.scripps.edu/people/goodsell
Gabriel Lander
Gabe Lander carries out post-doctoral research in the Eva Nogales lab, where he investigates the structural basis of microtubule instability. The dynamic nature of microtubules is a crucial aspect of their function in cellular processes, notably during chromosome alignment and separation during cell division. He collaborates to examine the molecular role of GTP hydrolysis in microtubules dynamics, and how this process affects the structural conformation of the tubulin during microtubule polymerization and depolymerization. In addition to performing research, Gabe also works hard to promote scientific awareness within the general public. The non-scientific community plays a significant role in determining scientific policy and funding, and for this reason it is crucial that researchers perform some type of outreach. To this end, has given lectures about his research at science museums and high school programs, in addition to utilizing graphics programs to render images and movies to aid in explaining complex scientific concepts to non-experts.
http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~glander/index.php
Arthur Olson
Arthur J. Olson is a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute where he holds the Anderson Research Chair. He is the founder and Director of the Molecular Graphics Laboratory at the Institute. He came to TSRI in 1981 to help establish a structural molecular biology program at the Institute. His group works at the interface between chemistry biology and computer science to develop and use computer modeling to help predict and understand the nature of molecular interactions in living systems. Software developed in his laboratory is used to visualize proteins and nucleic acids and to help design new drugs and other bioactive molecules and is used worldwide.
http://mgl.scripps.edu